A Brief Overview of Psychiatric Medication (5)

Abstract – Psychiatric medication has made many psychiatric conditions treatable within the last hundred years. Especially in combination with psychotherapy, medication has changed the lives of many patients radically, allowing them to have families and work in normal jobs even with conditions like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, which were previously considered untreatable. Advances in psychopharmacology not only improved the individual quality of life but also benefitted families, communities and even national economies. This article gives a brief overview of the main groups of psychiatric medication.

Keywords: medication, psychiatry

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A Brief Overview of Psychiatric Medication (5) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf

Bipolar Disorder and Medication (4)

Bipolar disorder is a condition affecting an individual’s affective states (mood). The different flavors of bipolar disorder have in common that there are alterations in mood between above ‘normal’ (hypomania, mania) and normal or below normal (melancholia, depression). The other important mood disorders are the various types of depression, while mania without episodes of depressions is a rarity. The first line treatment of choice in cases of bipolar disorder is medication. However, in the long run psychotherapy has shown to be successful in making the condition more manageable for individuals suffering from it. This article presents a brief overview of the different types of medication used for bipolar disorder.

Keywords: bipolar disorder, medication, psychiatry

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Bipolar Disorder and Medication (4) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf

Anxiety and Medication (4)

Anxiety is an emotion characterized by an unpleasant state of inner turmoil, often accompanied by nervous behavior, such as pacing back and forth, somatic complaints, and rumination. It is the subjectively unpleasant feelings of dread over anticipated events, such as the feeling of imminent death. However, with psychotherapy or a combination of psychotherapy and medication anxiety disorders have become highly treatable. Since there is a high comorbidity with other conditions, such as depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the use of an antidepressant for both the anxiety and depression can lead to significant improvements in the patient’s quality of life. This article explores the biology of anxiety and the different types of medication to treat it.

Keywords: anxiety, generalized anxiety disorder, panic attacks, medication, psychiatry

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Anxiety and Medication (4) Christian Jonathan Haverkampf

A Brief Introduction to the Treatment of Anxiety and Panic Attacks Dr Jonathan Haverkampf MD

A short 15 min talk on anxiety and panic attacks

Antidepressants and Sexual Dysfunction (1)

Sexual side effects of medication can be problematic for patients and, if they occur, often impact their well-being and relationships in significant ways. Common treatment options are switching the psychotropic medication, adding psychotropic or non-psychotropic medication and psychotherapeutic approaches.

Keywords: suicide, treatment, psychotherapy, medication, psychiatry

 

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Antidepressants and Sexual Dysfunction (1) Ch Jonathan Haverkampf

Psychiatric Medication – Weight Gain and the Metabolic Syndrome (1)

About 60% of the excess mortality observed in patients with severe mental illness (SMI), such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (MDD), is due to physical comorbidities, predominantly cardiovascular diseases. Weight gain and the metabolic syndrome are undesired effects of psychiatric medication, which ultimately can limit the use of a drug. Frequently, the decision whether to continue or switch a drug is not easy to make, and carefully weighing off the benefits and potential problems should be part of an informed treatment strategy.

Keywords: obesity, metabolic syndrome, medication, psychiatry

 

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Psychiatric Medication – Weight Gain and the Metabolic Syndrome (1) Ch Jonathan Haverkampf

Psychiatric Medication and QT Prolongation (1)

Several psychiatric medications can cause a lengthening of the QT interval in the ECG, which in some cases can lead to a potentially lethal situation. Under normal circumstances this condition is quite rare. However, in individuals with complicating preconditions and with certain types of medication, it is advisable to get an ECG and proceed with caution. Some drugs are more likely to cause QT prolongation than others, which should be kept in mind when prescribing psychiatric medication to a patient from a higher risk group.

Keywords: QT interval, QT prolongation, medication, antidepressant, antipsychotic, mood stabilizer

 

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Psychiatric Medication and QT Prolongation (1) Ch Jonathan Haverkampf

A Brief Overview of Psychiatric Medication (4)

Abstract – This article gives a brief overview of the main groups of psychiatric medication.

 

Keywords: medication, psychiatry

 

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A Brief Overview of Psychiatric Medication (4) Ch Jonathan Haverkampf

Depression and Medication (3)

Depression is the medical condition with one of the highest prevalence rates, but also one of the costliest ones in terms of human suffering, missed work hours, higher mortality and the higher incidence of physical illnesses. First-line treatment is usually a combination of medication and psychotherapy. In milder cases, psychotherapy alone may be sufficient, while in very severe cases, psychotherapy may not be possible. Antidepressants from a number of functional families are available, with the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) being the mostly used ones, followed by the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and antidepressants from other groups. In cases of treatment resistance, an increase in the dose, or if this is not possible a switch to a different group of antidepressants may be necessary. Rarely is a combination therapy needed. Selection of an antidepressant depends on the specific symptoms, such as insomnia or reduced activity, the patient’s current situation, including pregnancy or a requirement for alertness on the job, and many other factors, including past episodes of depression and the medication history.

Keywords: depression, medication, psychiatry

 

 

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Depression and Medication (3) Ch Jonathan Haverkampf

 


Dr Jonathan Haverkampf, M.D. MLA (Harvard) LL.M. trained in medicine, psychiatry and psychotherapy and works in private practice for psychotherapy, counselling and psychiatric medication in Dublin, Ireland. He also has advanced degrees in management and law. The author can be reached by email at jonathanhaverkampf@gmail.com or on the website www.jonathanhaverkampf.ie.

This article is solely a basis for academic discussion and no medical advice can be given in this article, nor should anything herein be construed as advice. Always consult a professional if you believe you might suffer from a physical or mental health condition. Neither author nor publisher can assume any responsibility for using the information herein.

Trademarks belong to their respective owners. No checks have been made. 

© 2012-2017 Christian Jonathan Haverkampf. All Rights Reserved

Unauthorized reproduction and/or publication in any form is prohibited.

Panic Attacks and Medication (2)

Panic attacks can interfere greatly with a patient’s social, professional and personal life. The first-line treatment is usually a combination of psychotherapy and medication. Medication broadly addresses two time horizons. In the short-run, benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine-like drugs reduces anxiety within twenty minutes to an hour, which is too long to treat an acute panic attack biologically, but which gives the patient a greater sense of control over the feelings of anxiety, which can in turn reduce anxiety and panic attacks. In the medium- to long-run, antidepressants with effectiveness on serotonergic pathways reduce or eliminate anxiety and the occurrence of panic attacks in the majority of patients. The group of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is probably the best researched and clinically most widely used family of antidepressants for cases of anxiety and panic attack disorders.

Keywords: panic attack, medication, psychiatry

 

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Panic Attacks and Medication (2) Ch Jonathan Haverkampf

 

 


Dr Jonathan Haverkampf, M.D. MLA (Harvard) LL.M. trained in medicine, psychiatry and psychotherapy and works in private practice for psychotherapy, counselling and psychiatric medication in Dublin, Ireland. He also has advanced degrees in management and law. The author can be reached by email at jonathanhaverkampf@gmail.com or on the websites www.jonathanhaverkampf.ie and www.jonathanhaverkampf.com.

This article is solely a basis for academic discussion and no medical advice can be given in this article, nor should anything herein be construed as advice. Always consult a professional if you believe you might suffer from a physical or mental health condition. Neither author nor publisher can assume any responsibility for using the information herein.

Trademarks belong to their respective owners. No checks have been made. 

© 2012-2017 Christian Jonathan Haverkampf. All Rights Reserved

Unauthorized reproduction and/or publication in any form is prohibited.